Rafa Roundup: September 10, 2013

Tennis Magazine
Tennis Magazine

… In the larger context, Nadal is easing into some glorified territory. He’s got 13 majors now, breaking a tie with Roy Emerson, and finds himself all alone in third place all-time. Suddenly, Pete Sampras (14) and even Federer (17) seem within reach. Nadal, despite his history of knee histrionics, is the only player to win a Grand Slam title nine years in a row.

… “I think on court I am a positive player,” Nadal said on Monday night. “Whether things are not going well or are going well, I am never very sad or have a negative attitude on court. “When somebody is winning you need to write [stories], and the people think that something has changed. But the real thing is I am playing well. That’s all, no?”

… So when it was over, Rafa fell again. Twice. The first was the usual championship drop, but he instantly sprang back up to shake hands at net. Then, after dropping his racket, Nadal turned toward his box — all the faces that have long kept him going — and took a step on court. His legs gave. He collapsed flat onto his stomach, and lay under the lights and eyes of thousands, face covered, back trembling. Five, 10 seconds passed.

Then Nadal did what he always does, bad moment or good. He gathered himself, and got back on his feet. The winner’s check was waiting. The queen, too.

… Rafael Nadal is a singularly compelling player in my view, and every time he succeeds tennis seems better for it. His latest victory at the U.S. Open was no exception to that rule.

… Think about this question: What would you do if you’re a guest writer at a blog devoted to chronicling tennis and the adventures of Roger Federer in particular, and you watch Rafael Nadal own the rest of the ATP Tour on hardcourts, thereby mounting a full frontal assault on Federer’s 17 major titles and his place in history? Yeah, not an easy question to answer, is it? Viewpoint, mindset, orientation, stylistic preferences, perceived slights (or lack thereof) in the media — those and other things would shape your answer…

… Nadal said the only doubt in his mind when he began his comeback in February had been whether he would be fit enough to play. “Even though I was out for seven months, I was sure that I hadn’t forgotten how to play tennis,” he said. “If you are healthy and if you have already been at the top of the game for eight or nine years and you stop for seven months, why will you not have the chance to be back there?”

… Nadal is closing in on Federer’s grand slam haul of 17 but the US Open runner-up, Novak Djokovic, says he will return stronger

One comment

  1. I like the approach to Rafa in these interviews:

    1) He’s Coming, And He Won’t Stop

    2) Yeah, not an easy question to answer, is it? Viewpoint, mindset, orientation, stylistic preferences, perceived slights (or lack thereof) in the media — those and other things would shape your answer…

    3) “Even though I was out for seven months, I was sure that I hadn’t forgotten how to play tennis,” he said. “If you are healthy and if you have already been at the top of the game for eight or nine years and you stop for seven months, why will you not have the chance to be back there?”

    and many others …. Amazing. I love you my baby Rafa!

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